Dictionary > American black bear

American black bear

American black bear

American black bear – the most common bear species in the world

American Black Bear Definition

The American black bear (Ursus americanus) is a medium-sized bear with a brown muzzle and black fur. Although most of them have black fur, some of them have brown pelage. Hence, they are sometimes mistaken for brown bears. By contrast, black bears have longer, less heavily furred ears. They also have a convex rather than a concave face profile. (Ref.1, Ref.2)

Black bears show sexual dimorphism. Males are larger than females, about 20% to 60%. (Ref.2) The adult male weight ranges from 60 kg to 300 kg whereas the adult females weigh between 40 kg and 80 kg. The typical adult size is between 130 cm and 190 cm. They are omnivores. They feed on insects (e.g. ants), nuts, berries, grasses, and other vegetation. They may also hunt and feed on deer fawns and moose calves. (Ref.2)

They are the most common bear species in the world. (Ref.2) They are included in the Least-Concern Species of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.

For more photos and info on American black bears, especially their habitat, distribution, reproduction, and social system: see American Black Bear – Bears of the World.

Scientific classification:
• Kingdom: Animalia
• Phylum: Chordata
• Class: Mammalia
• Order: Carnivora
• Family: Ursidae
Scientific name: Ursus americanus (formerly, Euarctos americanus)

See also

References

  1. Ursus americanus (American black bear). (2020). Animal Diversity Web. https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Ursus_americanus/
  2. American Black Bear | International Association for Bear Research and Management. (2017). International Association for Bear Research and Management. https://www.bearbiology.org/bear-species/american-black-bear/

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