Dictionary > Rebound phenomenon

Rebound phenomenon

Definition
noun
(1) A temporary deviation from a normal state in the opposite direction following an abrupt removal or discontinuation of a variable, such as a treatment suddenly discontinued after a long-term use, a passive resistance released suddenly, an undershoot, etc., in an effort to restore balance or homeostasis
(2) A condition wherein the maximum therapeutic effect is reached, and the opposite effect ensues
Supplement
For example, a rebound phenomenon occurs when the sudden discontinuation of medication results in the relapse of symptoms that are worse than those before the treatment. Thus, treatments capable of causing rebound effects have to be withdrawn gradually. Another example is the posthypoglycemic hyperglycemia characterized by a rebound hyperglycemia after a period of hypoglycemia. When the blood glucose level is low the body tends to compensate by producing regulatory hormones that incite the liver to produce glucose from stored glycogen. Thus, the outcome is an increase of blood glucose or hyperglycemia. Another is the Stewart-Holmes sign seen in individuals with cerebellar deficit or a lesion in the cerebellum.
Rebound phenomenon is also described when rebound effects ensues after the individual developed tolerance to the drug. An example is the prolonged use of pain killers that lead to the development of tolerance to these drugs. Eventually, the pain killers become less effective. This leads to headaches that are more frequent or worse than before.
Word origin: French rebondir + Greek phainomenon anything seen
Also called:

  • rebound effect

See also:

  • Stewart-Holmes test
  • Somogyi phenomenon


  • You will also like...

    Cambial cells
    Plant Tissues

    Plant organs are comprised of tissues working together for a common function. The different types of plant tissues are m..

    Circulation
    Circulation

    The circulatory system is key to the transport of vital biomolecules and nutrients throughout the body. Learn about the ..

    Peppered moth ("Biston betularia") melanic and light form
    Examples of Natural Selection

    Darwin's Finches are an example of natural selection in action. They are an excellent example of the way species' gene p..

    "Opabinia regalis"
    The Evolutionary Development of Multicellular Organisms

    Multicellular organisms evolved. The first ones were likely in the form of sponges. Multicellularity led to the evolutio..

    Biological Viruses
    Biological Viruses

    Viruses possess both living and non-living characteristics. This unique feature distinguishes them from other organisms...

    Thermographic image of face and neck
    Regulation of Organic Metabolism, Growth and Energy Balance

    The human body is capable of regulating growth and energy balance through various feedback mechanisms. Get to know the e..

    Related Articles...

    No related articles found

    See all Related Topics