Dictionary > Redundancy Hypothesis

Redundancy Hypothesis

Definition
noun
A theory that assumes one or more species impart a role within an ecological unit to maintain dynamic stability and resiliency.
Supplement
Redundancy hypothesis refer to the enhancement of species that can compensate each other if some species loss due to harsh conditions such particular species has the ability to recover from environmental disturbances. This theory considers what species contributed to the ecosystem and services it can offer to an ecological unit, thus elimination of several species does not matter as long as the ecosystem services are compensated.
Redundancy hypothesis entails that the more species are present in an ecological unit, the rate of ecosystem function also increases but up to some point, beyond this point species become redundant and does not have any additional affect to the ecosystem functions, thereby the loss of certain species has no primary effect to the diversity of an ecosystem. There are no fixed relationship between diversity and ecosystem yet the functions of an ecosystem are the results of interaction among species.
Ecological Redundancy Hypothesis are sometimes refer to as functional compensation wherein particular species are characterized to its efficiency in providing services in the community when conditions are stressed in order to maintain and sustain comprehensive stability in the ecosystem. An increase in stressed improve the species susceptibility to the following disturbances, thereby species enhances to the ecosystem resilience.
See also:


You will also like...

Digestion and Absorption of Food
Digestion and Absorption of Food

The gastrointestinal system breaks down particles of ingested food into molecular forms by enzymes through digestion and..

Ecosystem Succession
Ecosystem Succession

If the balance of nature is left untouched, landscapes can change dramatically over time. A previous ecosystem is supers..

Growth Patterns
Growth Patterns

This tutorial describes the sigmoid curve, annual plant growth, tree growth, human growth, and insect growth as the grow..

Peppered moth ("Biston betularia") melanic and light form
Examples of Natural Selection

Darwin's Finches are an example of natural selection in action. They are an excellent example of the way species' gene p..

takahē
Takahē (Porphyrio hochstetteri)

Meet the colorful takahē, an extremely rare flightless bird. Find out more about its unique features and why they matte..

Buttress roots
Roots

This study guide tackles plant roots in greater detail. It delves into the development of plant roots, the root structur..

Related Articles...

No related articles found

See all Related Topics