Dictionary > First-order kinetics

First-order kinetics

Definition
noun
An order of chemical reaction in which the rate of the reaction depends on the concentration of only one reactant, and is proportional to the amount of the reactant.
Supplement
It may be represented by the equation, rate = kA, where k is the reaction rate constant, and A is the concentration of the reactant.
An example of a reaction in a first-order is the decomposition of N2o5:

N2o5 → 2NO2 + ½ O2
because the rate of reaction depends on the concentration of N2o5 raised to the first power.

Compare: second-order kinetics

See also: chemical kinetics, reactant, reaction rate constant, chemical reaction.


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