Dictionary > Hardy-Weinberg principle

Hardy-Weinberg principle

Definition
noun
A principle stating that both allele and genotype frequencies in a randomly-mating population remain constant – and remain in this equilibrium across generations — unless a disturbing influence is introduced.
Supplement
For instance, a population containing the genotypes AA, aa and Aa, the frequency of AA will always be p2, aa will be q2, and Aa will be 2pq at equilibrium, where the p is the frequency of A and q is the frequency of a.
Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg principle indicates evolution of species. Examples of disturbing influences include non-random mating, mutations, selection, limited population size, random genetic drift and gene flow.
Word origin: named after G. H. Hardy and Wilhelm Weinberg.
Abbreviation: HWP

Variants:


You will also like...

Cell structure
Cell Structure

A typical eukaryotic cell is comprised of cytoplasm with different organelles, such as nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, G..

Photosynthesis and respiration
Plant Metabolism

Plants are responsible for incredible feats of molecular transformation. Plant processes, such as photosynthesis, photop..

Control of body movement
Control of Body Movement

Some of the body movements can be controlled at will, others cannot. The body has a motor program, which is the pattern ..

Growth Patterns
Growth Patterns

This tutorial describes the sigmoid curve, annual plant growth, tree growth, human growth, and insect growth as the grow..

Gene Pool and Speciation
The Gene Pool and Population Genetics

According to Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection, preferable genes are favored by nature in the gene pool, and ..

Genetics and Evolution
Genetics and Evolution

Humans are diploid creatures. This means that for every chromosome in the body, there is another one to match it. Howeve..

Related Articles...

No related articles found

See all Related Topics