Dictionary > Hybrid

Hybrid

hybrid definition

Hybrid
n., plural: hybrids
[ˈhaɪbrɪd]
Definition: the combination of two or more different things

Definition
noun, plural form: hybrids
(reproductive biology) The offspring resulting from the cross between parents of different species or sub-species
(molecular biology) A complex formed by joining two complementary strands of nucleic acids
Supplement
A hybrid, in general, refers to any of mixed origin or composition, or the combination of two or more different things. In molecular biology, a hybrid is the complex formed when two complementary strands of nucleic acids join.
In reproductive biology, a hybrid is an offspring produced from a cross between parents of different species or sub-species. An example of an animal hybrid is a mule. The animal is produced by a cross between a horse and a donkey. Liger, the offspring of a tiger and a lion, is another animal hybrid. In plants, hybridization is relatively common and several plant hybrids are produced through natural means or by assisted breeding. In agriculture, hybridization is one of the means through which crop varieties with preferred traits (e.g. improved resilience against certain diseases) are produced.
Different types of hybrids:

  • Single cross hybrid – the first generation of offspring resulting from a cross between purebred parents
  • Double cross hybrid – offspring resulting from a cross between two hybrids of single cross
  • Three-way cross hybrid – offspring from a cross between a single cross hybrid and an inbred line
  • Triple cross hybrid – offspring resulting from the crossing of two different three-way cross hybrids
  • Population hybrid – offspring resulting from the crossing of plants or animals in a population with another population. For instance, a cross between different races

Word origin: Latin hybrida, hibrida (“a crossbred animal”)
Synonym(s):

See also:

Read: Non-Mendelian Inheritance – Biology Tutorials

 

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Quiz

Choose the best answer. 

1. Which of these conditions will likely produce a hybrid?
2. At a molecular level, which of these examples is a hybrid?
3. Which of these is NOT a hybrid?
4. The first generation of offspring resulting from a cross between purebred parents
5. Offspring resulting from a cross between two hybrids of single cross

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