Dictionary > Passive agglutination

Passive agglutination

Definition
noun
An agglutination reaction of inert particles coated with soluble antigen through an antiserum specific for the adsorbed antigen
Supplement
Agglutination basically pertains to the clumping of particles as it comes from the Latin word agglutinare, which means to glue. It occurs when an antigen is mixed with a corresponding antibody, isoagglutinin. This is the underlying principle in certain biological methods such as the identification of specific bacterial antigen and the identity of the bacteria as well.
Agglutination may be passive or active. In active agglutination, the complex formed from the reaction of antigen with the antibody is a large particulate whereas in passive agglutination, the resulting agglutination reaction would be observable only when the antigen is first attached to cetain particles, like latex beeds.
An example of the demonstration of passive agglutination is the agglutination reaction where a soluble antigen, for example gonadotropin is linked to inert particles, for example latex beads or tanned erythrocytes. Many antigens are able to couple with rbc and form stable reagents for antibody detection, e.g. antigens of E.coli, Yersinia, lipopolysaccharide of N. meningitides, toxoplasma, and so on.1
Compare:

Synonym(s):

  • indirect agglutination
  • See also:

    Related term(s):

  • agglutination
  • reverse passive agglutination
  • Reference(s):

    1 Rao, C. Vaman. An introduction to immunology. Boca Raton: CRC Press; 2002.


    You will also like...

    Muscle
    Muscle

    Muscle cells are specialized to generate force and movement. Learn about the different types of muscle tissues in this t..

    Cambial cells
    Plant Tissues

    Plant organs are comprised of tissues working together for a common function. The different types of plant tissues are m..

    "Opabinia regalis"
    The Evolutionary Development of Multicellular Organisms

    Multicellular organisms evolved. The first ones were likely in the form of sponges. Multicellularity led to the evolutio..

    Cell structure
    Cell Structure

    A typical eukaryotic cell is comprised of cytoplasm with different organelles, such as nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, G..

    Plant meristem
    Plant Meristems and Growth

    In plants, growth occurs in meristems, which are the site of repeated cell division of unspecialized cells. These cells ..

    Types and Causes of Brain Damage
    Types and Causes of Brain Damage

    This tutorial describes the different types and causes of brain damage. Find out how genetics, physical injury, lack of ..